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Politics

New Orleans Attorney's Judy Barrasso (left) and Celeste Coco-Ewing (right)



According to a report by WAFB-TV in Baton Rouge, nearly 200 female attorney's have signed a petition to block Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the U. S. Supreme Court. The petition (copied from WAFB-TV's website) reads:

We are members of the Louisiana State Bar Association with decades of experience practicing in federal and state courts inside and outside of Louisiana--and we are women.

We urge you to vote no on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the United States Supreme Court. Putting aside the serious sexual assault allegations leveled against him, Judge Kavanaugh’s conduct during the Senate Judiciary Committee Hearing on September 27th established that he lacks the judicial temperament, credibility, and respect for the Constitutional advice and consent process and for the United States Senate.

Judicial temperament, credibility, and respect for the Constitutional process and the Senate, a co-equal branch of the United States Government, should be paramount requisites for a candidate for the U.S. Supreme Court.

We draw upon our own courtroom experiences to inform you that had an attorney or a criminal defendant behaved similarly during a court appearance, that attorney or criminal defendant would have been reprimanded, likely sanctioned, and possibly jailed for contempt of court.

Based on Judge Kavanaugh’s conduct alone, he should not be appointed to the highest Court in our land.

It is imperative that we preserve the nation's confidence in the Supreme Court, as a non-partisan arm of our government, particularly in these troubling times.

We ask you to take a step of courage.

Vote against his confirmation when it comes to the Senate floor. Put nation over party.

The women say Kavanaugh’s actions during his confirmation hearing should be enough to disqualify him from consideration. “We draw upon our own courtroom experiences to inform you that had an attorney or a criminal defendant behaved similarly during a court appearance, that attorney or criminal defendant would have been reprimanded, likely sanctioned, and possibly jailed for contempt of court. Based on Judge Kavanaugh’s conduct alone, he should not be appointed to the highest Court in our land,” the letter said.

Bear in mind, that prior to this article going online, I made a concerted effort to obtain the list of those female attorney's who have signed this petition. While I was unsuccessful in obtaining said list, one Baton Rouge attorney, Jill Craft, who is supporting the move said “I believe that our system of justice rises and falls on the integrity of the system itself and the stability and temperament of its ambassadors,” Craft said.

Personally, I find it curious that, even though the promoter's of this petition claim it's based on Kavanaugh's "temperament," there are apparently no male attorney's who have signed the petition. No male attorney's noticed the conduct that have raised the ire of less than 1% of attorney's statewide? Perhaps the male attorney's understood that Judge Kavanaugh's family was and is being viciously attacked, with a publised political "cartoon" demeaning the Judge's juvenile daughter.

I also question the whereabouts of a similar petition seeking to bring charges against Christine Blasey Ford and her stalwart "manager," Senator Dianne Feinstein, for bringing blatantly obvious false charges against a man whose integrity has been backed by numerous others, as well as professional organizations.

Please don't think that everyone is ignorant and that your assertion "based on Judge Kavanaugh’s conduct alone, he should not be appointed to the highest Court in our land," holds water, as being the your sole reason for bringing this petition forth. This move is disappointing, to say the least. It not only reeks of bias, it's timing (just a couple of days before the vote) parallels that of Senator Feinstein; "wait, wait, until the last minute and limit it to females."

So far, I know the names of attorney's that I would never hire to represent me in anything nor, with good conscience, recommend to friends or family. I suppose, in the end, there was some good to come out of it.



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